When an LSD turns into a PB

Smothering with a head cold, and cursing the loss of my MacBook Pro which simply went to sleep last night and couldn’t be awoken this morning, it seems like the best thing to do between vicious sneezes and nose blowing is dwell on the past. The immediate past that is. Before my nose started to run, I had my best long run ever. Perhaps the two are connected. One was certainly more fun than the other.

laptopYesterday I ran 21km, for the first time since Dec 1, with only a brief stop at 7- Eleven to buy Gatorade, on a very hilly route, in just under 1:52. Yep my LSD was faster than any of the three half marathons I’ve run despite the route being much hillier than each of the race routes. So, why?!

Firstly, my husband ran with me for the first 10 km. At 6’4”, he’s just a bit taller than me, and his legs are at least a foot longer than mine, so he can run faster without having run more than a few kilometres in the past few weeks. It’s not fair I know, but it was helpful for keeping me paced around the dodgy 7-10km mark when there is still a LONG way to go.

The temperature was only a chilly  22˚C, the humidity a mere 88%, so the weather probably had a positive effect on performance.

I didn’t feel nauseous, nor did my stomach lurch as if a small animal had just awoken from hibernation in my stomach. This is excellent news as anyone who has spoken to me about running in the past few weeks has heard ad nauseum how mid-race nausea/stomach upset is my biggest concern.

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I had a cup of coffee and a few glasses of water, and munched on three thin gingersnap cookies before running. I ran with two 8oz bottles of Accelerade, slightly more diluted than manufacturer’s instructions, in a fuel belt, then refilled the bottles with Gatorade at 15.5km. I know the fuel stop of 2-3 minutes did allow some recovery but I couldn’t risk continuing another 6km without anything to drink. It may only have been 22˚C when I started running at 7:30am, but the temperature and sun were certainly edging up by 9:00am.

As it was Chinese New Year there was very little traffic and I did not have to stop at any road junctions; this is extremely rare and offered a great endurance training opportunity. I had a run-free day on Friday so my legs were rested. I guess this helped.

I ate two large pasta meals on Friday as it was a holiday so we ate out for lunch which I rarely do. I’m a lazy cook so lunch is often a bagel with peanut butter or if I’m feeling very culinary, I microwave two poached eggs and stick them between some toast. I’m sure Friday’s carb-rich combined with fish protein meals helped me on Saturday morning.

I drank no water during the run. I think this may be important as often I drink out of fear of getting dehydrated. I think though that too much water in the digestive system can be bad news.

What’s more, until this stinking head cold hit last night, I felt great for the rest of the day. I sprinted the last 500m of the run which means there was still something left in  my legs. All in all, yesterday’s LnotsoSD was a great confidence booster, and a worry queller, that I will dredge up from memory the next time I try race a Half Marathon (on March 16th if all goes to plan) to convince myself that yes, I can in fact do it – as long as my husband runs with me, I carry three bottles of Accelerade and Gatorade, drink no water at all, the weather is cooler than at any other time in the previous 50 years, I stuff my face with carbs, shrimp and spinach the day before, and run not too fast, on rested legs, after eating three cookies and a strong coffee for breakfast.

So that’s the post-mortem on the best run evva.

I’m hoping that a visit to a Mac store tomorrow will enable an equally essential post-mortem and file retrieval on the MacBook. I had just discovered some hilarious videos the kids had made while we lived in Norway, and was in the process of organising them to back them up, when the grim reaper from Apple heaven struck. I’ll be very upset if I’ve lost them. At least I had backed up my novel-in-progress though it was sobering to discover that in the past year, I added a mere 10,000 words to the draft. Yes, I’ve been 80% (and now 90%) finished the first draft for the past 12 months. Yikes! I blame this running lark for making me care much less about this fact than I should. Or maybe it’s the damn head cold that’s dulling my senses. Let’s see how I feel tomorrow.

P.S. In the very unlikely event that anyone from Accelerade or Gatorade’s distributor in Malaysia is reading, please don’t feel obliged to send me any freebies or testers. No, there’s no obligation at all. However, it is my birthday next month. Just sayin’. 

UPDATE Feb3: The mother board on my laptop is dead which means that effectively my MacBook Pro has gone to Apple Heaven after 5.5 years of service. The hard disk is however thankfully intact so I should be able to transfer its contents to another computer which I will fastidiously back up. I still have a wretched cold.

Speed Vs Aerobic Endurance

An article from the Competitor Running website showed up in my Facebook feed today and I thought I’d share it as it’s something that resonated more than the other 50 running things I’ve glanced at today. I’ve mentioned in the past that I have a problem with endurance. I find 21 km races very challenging and am a long way from attempting a marathon. Yet, since I returned from injury in October I’ve been doing weekly speed workouts with the F1 Running Club and I’m faster than I thought. I’m fast for very short distances. My 12 km race last weekend went well and I ran at my best race pace yet, though for the last 2 km I felt nauseous, though I was only maintaining my pace not increasing it. In previous long races I’ve blamed the nausea at 10km onwards on gels, but I’ve given up gels so what caused the nausea on Sunday? Well, after reading this article, my latest theory is that the nausea is an indication of my poor aerobic endurance. The solution I think is to do more frequent and longer tempo runs. I think. I have until mid-March until I attempt another half marathon so I’m going to work hard in the next two months on pushing up my aerobic endurance. Tonight though, I’m off to my running club to do 5 x 1km. Yep, that can make me feel nauseous too. If only I could run without my belly!

Here’s the link to the Competitor Running article: Speed Vs Aerobic Endurance

MWM Training Session 2

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As an introvert (who does a good impression of an extrovert), the solitary nature of running appeals to me. But even introverts, and solitary runners, can benefit from company and sometimes they even enjoy it.
Such was the case yesterday at the Malaysia Women Marathon training session, the second in a series of running clinics organised by MWM Race Director Karen Loh in the lead-up to the 10km, 21km, and 42km MWM races on March 16th in Shah Alam.
The meeting point yesterday was Padang Merbok. This is the start and finish location of a number of popular races including the upcoming MPIB 12 km on January 5th. It’s reasonable to expect a car park to be deserted at 6 AM on the last Sunday before Christmas but this place was a hubbub of activity in the dark as runners gathered to embark on their LSDs in the relative cool early morning air. I know – only people who live in the Tropics consider 24 degrees Celsius and 100% humidity to be cool!
Race Director Karen, accompanied by the MWM half marathon mentors, Lorna Wong and Sheela Samivellu, explained that the running session would consist of two 6 km loops along the hilly – very hilly – terrain of Bukit Tunku. For any ladies who had signed up for the MPIB race, this was a great opportunity to check out some of the route.

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Hilly route! Two loops added up to 13.5km on my watch.

After our warm-up,  around 20 ladies and our mentors, took off. We did the first loop, which turned out to be almost 7 km, slow and steady, passing and greeting many other runners en route. Each runner ran at a pace they found comfortable so we ended up breaking into small groups. It was nice to chat and run, and as always happens when I run with company, I marvelled at how much easier it is, than running alone. Just like life I guess.
After refreshments – water, isotonic drinks, mandarin oranges and apples, kindly provided by Karen – we set off a second time, with instructions to try the route at a higher pace. I was a little faster than the leading group and was very fortunate, though somewhat apprehensive, when Sheela, MWM mentor and local champion runner, accompanied me up a hill and started to pace me. We ran the rest, around 4km, of the route together and no kidding it was the fastest I’ve run for anything over 1km – ever. If it had been a race, I’d have slowed or even stopped, but because I was running with Sheela I didn’t want to humiliate myself by showing weakness. There were several lessons learned there, not only about the undiscovered power and speed in my legs, but more importantly I suspect, the importance of the mind in pushing through discomfort in the search for glory (or just a sense of achievement which feels glorious).

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Post-run stretching and mentoring session.

Back at the car park, Karen once again doled out refreshments, before the group gathered to chat, take photos and do a Q&A session with the mentors. Interval workouts and tempo runs were discussed, before I jokingly, but really quite seriously, enquired if the MWM ladies could meet up and run together every week. Karen informed us that there are plans in place to set up an MWM runners club. As soon as more details are available, I will of course post them here.

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L-R: Johanna (The Expat Runner), Sue-Ling (who acted as a sweeper during the run), Karen (Race Director) & Lorna (Mentor)

There were many different levels of runners at yesterday’s session. For some it was about pushing themselves up hills, resisting the urge to slow to a walk; for me it was about pushing past my fear of running fast. Irrespective of what our individual ambitions or self-imposed limitations were, every single person at the clinic had three things in common: each one of us was Dreaming, Believing, and Becoming. That’s what MWM is about.

To register for the Malaysia Women Marathon click here.

Sheela, Half Marathon mentor, champion runner and my personal hero yesterday, is third from the right.
Sheela, Half Marathon mentor, champion runner and my personal hero yesterday, is third from the right.

Thank you to Karen Loh for most of the photos shown in this post.

Posterior Tibial Tendonitis

When I first went to the doctor at the sports clinic, 12 days ago, I suspected tendonitis. No, no, it wasn’t tendonitis, she said with professional certainty; I had sprained my ankle (without noticing), pulling my deltoid ligament. Humph. Weird that I could turn my ankle and not notice, I thought, but she was a doctor, I’m not. So as advised, I stopped running, left my race bibs in a drawer, went to physio several times, initially for ultrasound and then progressed to ankle strengthening exercises. Rehab was going well.

Still perturbed over the whole ankle sprain diagnosis, I continued my self-diagnosis by Google, and came up with Posterior Tibial Tendinitis (PTT), a common complaint among runners and a condition which left untreated results in flat feet. The symptoms fit, the cause fit; it made sense. The physio conceded that it might be PTT, rather than a pulled ligament, then directed me to the balance board where I remembered why I’m such a lousy skier. She seemed to think it was ok for me to try running again if it didn’t hurt. I can’t blame her for buckling in the face of my determination. And my ankle no longer hurt!
I started running again, a week after the ankle sprain diagnosis. I ran on three consecutive days, ankle taped for support, making sure to ice the foot after each run. Two runs went really well. I was even able to do a decent tempo run. I was back! The third run unfortunately involved some hills due to a road closure. Don’t ask! The foot ached a bit during the 8km loop but pain certainly didn’t prohibit my enjoyment. I started to envisage the start line of the Standard Chartered KL Half Marathon again and dared to hope I might get to cross the finish line too. Yes, I thought, I will be able to run! Whoohoo!
But after the slow hilly run, the foot was sore and became swollen. It was time to get help from a professional who was experienced in treating runners (as clearly, the folks at the sports clinic weren’t). I needed someone who understood not only running injuries but also a runner’s impatience to tie up their laces and get out on the road again as soon as possible.
Now, in my previous life I worked with surgeons in the UK developing orthopaedic devices, and in such milieux, the chiropractor was not highly regarded. As a result, I have held a deep prejudice against such practitioners for two decades. But by last Friday, I would have allowed the man who comes to read the electricity metre to examine my foot if he’d shown any interest, or vague knowledge about ankle anatomy. A chiropractor, in a Joint Specialist clinic, who had been highly recommended by some running folk, did seem somewhat more qualified for the job then the meter man. So off I went again, sitting in traffic for 20 mins, thinking how I could have run to the clinic in 10. But of course, if I could run, I wouldn’t be going to the clinic. Sigh.
After much prodding and poking (what I would call a thorough examination), an x-ray, the subsequent appearance of bruising in my inner foot which I was assured was not related to prodding and poking, a close look at the wear pattern on my running shoes, and another round of somewhat painful palpating of my medial ankle, the chiropractor concluded that it was my posterior tibial tendon and not my deltoid ligament that was injured. Sometimes, it doesn’t feel good to be right.
So two weeks after the initial (mis) diagnosis, I’m back to where I started. Actually, as I’ve made the foot worse, I’m even further back than that. Rest, ice, for a few days, then I will start ultrasound therapy again. As to the cause of PTT after 20 months running? It might be my shoes – I’ve become an over-pronator as I’ve moved from heel to foot strike running, and my shoes are not designed for such – or it might be related to tightened Achilles Tendons, the souvenirs of my blissful barefoot runs on a beach in Vietnam back in April. It’s probably a combination of these factors together with my recent increase in training pace.

Either way, I’m still benched, and I’m back to finding alternative ways of keeping up my fitness and strength without pounding pavements. When the SCKL marathon was postponed in June because of the Haze, I never dreamt that I’d miss the race altogether but I now I certainly will. Thankfully, I think I’ve now found a clinic that will help me back to full fitness. Whether it will be in time to run the BSN Putrajaya Half Marathon on Oct 19th remains to be seen.

p.s. I decided not to treat you to a photo with this post. Frankly, I’m sick of looking at my own feet, and think you must be too. If there’s one minor consolation – and I do mean minor – over not running, it’s the prospect of a decent pedicure and prettier toes.   Hopefully, this improved version of my footsies will be strictly temporary.

BSN Putrajaya Marathon

 

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There are only eight days left to register for the BSN Putrajaya Half Marathon and 10 km races on the night of Oct 19th. Sorry if you were hoping to do the marathon-all the spots have been taken. It’s a great event, very well run, on a relatively flat, spacious course. Last year I won 400rm, which really sweetened the experience of competing my first 21 km race. Here’s the link for revisit ion and information. http://home.hooha.asia/bsnpnm-2013.aspx.